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, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
until 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight to buy that $2 ticket. >>> and overseas now to egypt, where opposition to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of t
of the war in gaza, when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead child. >> translator: i was here and i saw the child who was martyred. >> translator: the blood is on both of our hands. ours and the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, and as a human, i can't do anything for him because i know he has died now, you know? and you can't imagine if it's your baby, how do you feel? why? these raids, why? >> reporter: the influx of casualties, men, women, and children is overwhelming this hospital. underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. and what you're hearing behind me are the sounds of evening prayer beginning here in gaza city. throughout these prayers, oftentimes we're hearing again, the sounds of booms and we're seeing the lights of rockets headed toward israel. a lot of people are talk about whether or not war has been decl
regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have been a spontaneous demonstration and ambassador rice went out on sunday saying -- five days after, saying it
they sat down at the negotiating table. of course, with egypt as a immediatier, with the israelis. this time around, they were able to have at least some of their demands be met. first and foremost among those was that the border crossings order, that there is an easing of movement, of people, of goods. and then of course for both sides, it was stopping the violence. the israelis wanted to see an end to the rockets being launched at their population. the palestinians, hamas, wanted to see an end to israel's targeted assassinations to what they call israeli aggression against them. so for many here, this time around versus four years ago, they were able to actually, with an intermediary, again, negotiate a cease-fire. in the sense that they were able to force the israeli side to agree to some of their terms. but we'll have to see if those critical details are, in fact, implemented. will the border crossings really open? will the sea ports really be open? will people be able to have that freedom of movement that they are looking for? this is still, very much, as you say, a first ste
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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